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Online FredJ9

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Spring rate dilemma
« on: April 04, 2018, 07:47:57 PM »
I've had my new, old stock '15 Tiger Explorer for a month and a half now. I'm going to upgrade my fork and shock springs to suit my/our weight. I'm having issues calculating spring weights due to the massive weight variances. Just me, 230lbs geared up. Add my better half, 380lbs geared up. With all luggage and geared up for a trip, I calculate around 480lbs which is a touch over max payload of 467lbs.
Half of my riding will be solo (230lbs payload). A quarter will be with the Mrs (380lbs). And the remaining quarter will be a 480lb payload.
Given these payloads, what weight do you recommend I use to calculate fork and spring rates?
My gut tells me to figure 400 lbs and play with payload.
My Son works for Eibach who produces most springs for the auto/motorcycle industury. He's looking into it as well.

Offline vsteel

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2018, 03:38:44 AM »
I would go with your gut and do the 400 since that will cover a lot of your riding.  When you are fully loaded you are less likely to be tearing through rough terrain so being a little under sprung then won't be as big of an issue.


Offline mjab

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2018, 09:12:22 AM »
*Originally Posted by FredJ9 [+]
I've had my new, old stock '15 Tiger Explorer for a month and a half now. I'm going to upgrade my fork and shock springs to suit my/our weight. I'm having issues calculating spring weights due to the massive weight variances. Just me, 230lbs geared up. Add my better half, 380lbs geared up. With all luggage and geared up for a trip, I calculate around 480lbs which is a touch over max payload of 467lbs.
Half of my riding will be solo (230lbs payload). A quarter will be with the Mrs (380lbs). And the remaining quarter will be a 480lb payload.
Given these payloads, what weight do you recommend I use to calculate fork and spring rates?
My gut tells me to figure 400 lbs and play with payload.
My Son works for Eibach who produces most springs for the auto/motorcycle industury. He's looking into it as well.

I had a similar scenario. My weight, pillion weight and pillion+ luggage weight.
I changed to a Nitron R1 shocjk with remote adjuster so pre-load can be adjusted for the different weights.
Saved me a fortune as my Gen 1 is far better now than a 2 or 3 so no need to upgrade and lose shed loads on the value of mine
4 wheels move the body
2 wheels move the soul

Online XCaTel

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2018, 12:52:49 PM »
Go with 230lbs as your minimum weight with a nearly minimal preload and a spring rate that will cope with your range with nearly max preload. First you have to decide what your target SAG/Bike attitude is though. A decent suspension specialist should be able to advise on the required spring rate. Spring change only MAY be a little disappointing, the stronger spring MAY overwhelm your damping which would of been selected based on the original spring fitted. Hence others advice on a complete new shock. It is the rear that will be mostly affected by weight, if on a budget just try the rear first, you may well get away with leaving the front well alone, I did on my last bike. Have you measured your SAG with just you and then your max weight yet, it just helps you to understand how much the preload is being tested in the first place to inform your future choices.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2018, 12:57:41 PM by XCaTel »

Online FredJ9

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2018, 09:26:08 PM »
We really need to do the measurements.
My wife helped with my last bike (Scrambler) and we got it dialed in with shock replacements and stiffer springs.
This time I need another set of hands and eyes which my neighbor will certinally help with.
Funny thing... On RaceTechs spring locator guide, they don't even show a shock spring that is stiff enough for the max payload the bike is specked for. Fork springs they show no problem.
I gave RaceTech a call and am waiting for a call back and recommendations.

Offline Acko

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2018, 02:33:49 AM »
As mjab suggested, have a look at NITRON. They are an excellent shock that are built to your specification (not off the shelf) and are height adjustable. I installed one on my blackbird and it made a huge difference.
http://www.nitron.co.uk/pwpcontrol.php?pwpID=17766

Online FredJ9

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2018, 12:31:44 AM »
My son works for Eibach here in California. They are a German Company that makes springs for most suspension companies around the world, including Race Tech.
We both did a little research and decided heavier springs all around certinally won't hurt.
I used Race Tech's spring rate chart to guide us through it.
After the new springs and oil are changed (5W is recommended), I'll let you all know how it goes.

Offline Fuze

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2018, 02:51:08 AM »
I put the max spring that race tech makes in the tex rear (16.1?) and 1.0 in the front.    This was for 2 up with full topbox and panniers.
Happy overall.  It feels similar to the 2018 Tiger 1200 that I sampled 3 weeks ago. 

Online FredJ9

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2018, 03:44:15 AM »
 Yes, very similar. I went with 16.1 and 1.1 rear and front.
They were out of the 1.2's and have no idea when they would be produced again.

Offline Graybush

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #9 on: May 08, 2018, 04:01:19 AM »
I know every situation is different, but I recently changed the springs on my XT250, and just that made a huge difference.  I really should quit messing around and do the same on the Tiger.  If the shock needs to be revalved, there's a local guy who offered to do it for a really good price, but the 250 is doing fine without it.

The 250 now has an Eibach spring, and I'll probably put one on the Tiger, too.

 


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