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Online XCaTel

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #10 on: May 08, 2018, 10:00:49 AM »
*Originally Posted by FredJ9 [+]

Funny thing... On RaceTechs spring locator guide, they don't even show a shock spring that is stiff enough for the max payload the bike is specked for. Fork springs they show no problem.
I gave RaceTech a call and am waiting for a call back and recommendations.
I wouldn't be too concerned about that, the Gen 3 with TSAS rear shock gets overwhelmed (in terms of ride height) when pushed near the bikes loading capacity and it can not compensate fully with additional preload, there just isn't that range of adjustment in it. How to I know? It is much easier to get my feet on the ground when two up, by a good bit! The good news is that the SAG ratio front/back (hence rake/trail) still seem to fall in to an acceptable range for the bike and I find handling just fine. 

Online FredJ9

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #11 on: May 13, 2018, 02:19:50 PM »
Big difference for sure.
My better half hasn't ridden with me yet and I'm still playing with the settings for solo riding.
As with previous bikes, it'll be a little stiff for solo but with the extra added weight, it will be just fine.

Offline pmckinnon

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #12 on: May 14, 2018, 11:49:43 AM »
Wilburs progressive front spring changed the whole bikes handling

Online FredJ9

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #13 on: May 15, 2018, 05:42:45 PM »
*Originally Posted by Fuze [+]
I put the max spring that race tech makes in the tex rear (16.1?) and 1.0 in the front.    This was for 2 up with full topbox and panniers.
Happy overall.  It feels similar to the 2018 Tiger 1200 that I sampled 3 weeks ago.

I went on a ride with the Mrs yesterday evening. Cranked the preload up ten clicks, my hands are still tired. With that heavy spring, cranking on the preload adjuster is real workout. I'm thinking about making a tool to make the adjustments easy.
Fuse
Have you experienced this?

Offline Fuze

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #14 on: May 15, 2018, 07:01:52 PM »
I have not changed the preload since installing the new spring.  I have it on the second click and leave it there for solo or full loaded.  I will have to try changing the setting tonight and let you know my experience.  Based on physics, the knob should be more difficult to turn.  How does that go again...(recollecting school daze)...

Force X Distance = Work Done
((16.1 - 12.1)/12.1 ) X constant distance =  33.3% more work to turn that damn thingy.

A little lubricant on the preload adjuster threads may help.  Be really careful if you decide to remove the knob, There may be springs and balls ready to shoot in random directions underneath the knob.  I do not know for sure because I have not removed the knob.  On a previous bike, I experienced this surprise when doing a removal and just wanted to get you ready if you did try this yourself.

A DIY tool sounds like the Cockford Ollie.  :821:



« Last Edit: May 15, 2018, 07:04:39 PM by Fuze »

Online FredJ9

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #15 on: May 15, 2018, 10:06:55 PM »
I tried it again with a small rubber strap wrench. Works well but it takes a while.
I'll need to try your settings. I'm about 230lbs geared up and about 380lbs with my wife geared up.
Are we similar weights?

Offline Fuze

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #16 on: May 16, 2018, 12:16:48 PM »
I'm about 260 geared up so our total is about the same.

I checked the preload and it was at 14 clicks.  I forgot that I had turned it up during our last trip when we had the top box and side boxes on.  ( givi 47 Litre top and the Triumph pivoting panniers)

The preload knob was a bit of effort to turn due to the knob positioning and not being able to use your wrist to turn it.  The fingers do get a nice workout.  The knob turning action was very smooth so the effort was appropriate for the load.  Thankfully no binding or seizing going on here.  I set the preload at 4 clicks for now.


Story time:
Before the spring change the one item that bothered me was swinging out the side stand when loaded 2 up.  The stand would ground out before extending fully.  You had to tip the bike over to the right to extend the stand or perform some one legged lotus pose to lighten the bike while putting the stand out.  It was the one stone in my shoe.
After the change was happy times.  I had more useful available suspension travel and the side stand had plenty of free-board.  Also angle of the bike while parked on the sidestand was better.  I didn't have to pay as much attention to the slope of the ground.




« Last Edit: May 16, 2018, 12:24:08 PM by Fuze »

Offline Dilbert

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #17 on: May 16, 2018, 12:42:03 PM »
I've found that the rear end dips so much with a pillion and luggage that it's difficult to take it off the sidestand and the rear feels distinctly saggy, front extremely light, even with the preload fully wound in.

I was thinking of getting it re-sprung, but a local race tech guy reckons the damping may then suffer and it may be better to invest in a Nitron (+~£750 with remote adjuster) set to personal requirements, I think Triumph have cocked-up big time here, the Tiger 800 and 1050 were similarly under-sprung, but nowhere near as bad, I got Maxton's (UK) to sort the 800.

Having a suspension setup that requires 50% preload for just the rider doesn't sound very well designed to me  :013:


I'll never be old enough to know better !

Offline Dilbert

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #18 on: May 16, 2018, 12:49:31 PM »
*Originally Posted by Fuze [+]
I have not changed the preload since installing the new spring.  I have it on the second click and leave it there for solo or full loaded.  I will have to try changing the setting tonight and let you know my experience.  Based on physics, the knob should be more difficult to turn.  How does that go again...(recollecting school daze)...

Force X Distance = Work Done
((16.1 - 12.1)/12.1 ) X constant distance =  33.3% more work to turn that damn thingy.

A little lubricant on the preload adjuster threads may help.  Be really careful if you decide to remove the knob, There may be springs and balls ready to shoot in random directions underneath the knob.  I do not know for sure because I have not removed the knob.  On a previous bike, I experienced this surprise when doing a removal and just wanted to get you ready if you did try this yourself.

A DIY tool sounds like the Cockford Ollie.  :821:

Force x Distance = Torque (Nm)

Should be easier to adjust with the suspension unloaded i.e. on the centre stand  :028:


I'll never be old enough to know better !

Online XCaTel

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Re: Spring rate dilemma
« Reply #19 on: May 16, 2018, 01:11:47 PM »
*Originally Posted by Dilbert [+]
I've found that the rear end dips so much with a pillion and luggage that it's difficult to take it off the sidestand and the rear feels distinctly saggy, front extremely light, even with the preload fully wound in.

I was thinking of getting it re-sprung, but a local race tech guy reckons the damping may then suffer and it may be better to invest in a Nitron (+~£750 with remote adjuster) set to personal requirements, I think Triumph have cocked-up big time here, the Tiger 800 and 1050 were similarly under-sprung, but nowhere near as bad, I got Maxton's (UK) to sort the 800.

Having a suspension setup that requires 50% preload for just the rider doesn't sound very well designed to me  :013:
It's not that unusual, my last bike, 2016 Africa Twin used up 45% rear suspension travel for a 125Kg load with the factory preload setting, 7 clicks in, max rated load for the bike was 195Kg. At full preload, 35 tiring clicks, it still used just under 39% of full travel for a 125Kg load. +20mm HyperPro spring was a cheap and easy fix, damping didn't suffer too much.

 


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