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Offline Icy

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Animal-Related Motorcycle Collisions in North Dakota
« on: July 19, 2018, 03:17:49 PM »
Lesson: All The Gear All The Time!!!


Objective
To study the epidemiology and mortality of animal-motorcycle collisions.

Methods
A retrospective study of all motorcycle collisions recorded in the North Dakota Department of Transportation Crash Reporting System from January 2007 to December 2009 was conducted. Mortality was designated as the main outcome measure.

Results
Seven hundred sixty-six collisions involving 798 motorcycles were included in this study; 48 of these collisions were with animals (6.3% of all motorcycle collisions). Deer were the most common animal involved (81%). Most animal-motorcycle collisions took place during nighttime with clear weather and on straight rural roads. Drivers were older in animal collisions compared with nonanimal collisions (median of 44 vs 30 years old, respectively, P < .0001). Most drivers were males, whereas most passengers were females. Helmets were worn by only 32% of drivers and 12% of passengers. There were 4 (8%; 95% CI, 3%–20%) fatal animal collisions; 9% of the collisions with large animals were fatal compared with 3% of nonanimal collisions (P = .0411).

Conclusions
Animal-motorcycle collisions are a small subgroup of all motorcycle collisions, but with a high mortality rate. Efforts should be made to increase helmet usage, mitigate these collisions, and increase awareness of this problem among motorcycle riders.

https://www.wemjournal.org/article/S1080-6032(11)00243-2/fulltext

I know a good number of folks who are total anti-helmet, anti-gear (used to be one of them) but ever since I got on the TEX and my range extended to 700+ miles a day and 24 hours with total disregard to the state of the road - or the existence of it - these external threats are of great concern to me. Yes, dress for the slide, not the ride - but above all; dress to save your life. My wife took a spill at ~50 mph, catapulted and cartwheeled like a ragdoll (I'm still drinking heavily to erase that view I watched in my rear view mirror and still trying to do the same u-turn I did at that speed on a two lane road with a fully loaded bike and not having much luck with either of the two) her bike trashed completely, totalled beyond recognition, but she was fine other than a few bruises. My friend collided with a car and neither was that fast (according to the accident scene report) and he died after staying in coma for a few days - he didn't like wearing gear and always wore the legal bare minimum, including the brain bucket. Another hit a deer and the deer is toast, he had to buy new bike and new set of gear (blood and meat particles ruin CORDA) another one got hit by a deer and spent a week in hospital treating the road rash and let the meat regrow on the places where tarmac took some off - no helmet, no proper jacket, no proper protection to speak of and slow speeds.

If you are riding at night, on rural roads, at least put on a helmet! 
 :008:
 :821:
 :305:

I love how the report suggests "increase awareness of this problem"  :008: so there are folk out there who don't know that hitting a deer is a real problem at night on rural roads?  :084:  :192:
 :745:
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Offline ZShyster

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Re: Animal-Related Motorcycle Collisions in North Dakota
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2018, 04:58:26 PM »
Icy,

Thanks, it is always good to remind ourselves of the threats and what we can do to mitigate the risk.

In 1980 I was approximately 1 mile from the main gate at Williams Air Force Base, Arizona on a very dark two lane road at 0530 and I encountered a black bull on the road.  Fortunately, I was going slow enough to stop and go around him.  I cannot imagine what would have happened if I had hit him at 60 mph.  I learned from an old guy before that encounter, to never drive faster than your headlight.

Ride Safe.

ZShyster

Offline Icy

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Re: Animal-Related Motorcycle Collisions in North Dakota
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2018, 05:17:17 PM »
*Originally Posted by ZShyster [+]
Icy,

Thanks, it is always good to remind ourselves of the threats and what we can do to mitigate the risk.

In 1980 I was approximately 1 mile from the main gate at Williams Air Force Base, Arizona on a very dark two lane road at 0530 and I encountered a black bull on the road.  Fortunately, I was going slow enough to stop and go around him.  I cannot imagine what would have happened if I had hit him at 60 mph.  I learned from an old guy before that encounter, to never drive faster than your headlight.

Ride Safe.

ZShyster

 :460:

Roger  :028:

"never drive faster than your headlight" -> it's an old saying but is planted in physics. Those who rode in total darkness know this by intuition. For those who don't this is what it means:

Let's say you are doing 35 mph
That's ~17 yards a second

Lets say your headlights illuminate ~150 yards in front of you
It will take you ~9 seconds to reach what was just illuminated by your headlights

Leave yourself at least 4 seconds to react to what you just saw, the more the better.
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Offline CaptainTrips

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Re: Animal-Related Motorcycle Collisions in North Dakota
« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2018, 05:28:44 PM »
I watched my friend and riding buddy strike a bear at 65 MPH last August on a long, level, straight section of highway in mid-afternoon. He was looking off to the left when the bear emerged from the woods on the right at a full run and they converged in the middle of the lane. I was following him at the time and saw the whole thing. It all happened in about 3 seconds.

My friend sustained multiple injuries including two cracked vertebrae in his neck, two compressed vertebrae in his spine, broken collarbone, three broken ribs, broken cheekbone, ruptured spleen, two broken wrists with a total of 10 broken bones in his hands (many of his knuckles were broken).

He was wearing a Nolan N104 system helmet at the time. At the time of the collision, I believe that he had the chin bar up. He struck his cheek in the initial fall, then tumbled and (fortunately) the chin bar and visor closed. He then struck his right forehead very hard and tumbled. When I pulled up beside him, he was unconscious and had slid for a considerable distance face-down, with the helmet protecting his face and chin.

My friend has made a remarkable recovery. However, he still suffers symptoms from a severe brain concussion injury. There is absolutely no doubt that he would be dead without a helmet.

He is back riding. After having ridden for close to 50 years, he is unlikely to give it up just yet.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2018, 05:47:24 PM by CaptainTrips »
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Offline BayAreaCelt

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Re: Animal-Related Motorcycle Collisions in North Dakota
« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2018, 05:34:53 PM »
Crikey. Who the feck doesnt wear a helmet? I mean, thats... rather flat Earth, sorry to say. Darwin sorts those dull eyed mouth breathers out. Is it only an American thing? http://www.cnn.com/2011/US/07/04/new.york.motorcyclist.death/index.html

I mean... I dont see people in Europe (I have seen in random Asian countries) riding without Helmets. It is also the Law as well.

I admire America for many things, but some stuff they do go full retard.. Not wearing appropriate riding gear is up there for me personally.. I see folk on motorcycles in t shirts, shorts and flip flops in California, and in other states too. I hope very much they wipe out before they breed so as not to transmit teh stupids

Offline belpas

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Re: Animal-Related Motorcycle Collisions in North Dakota
« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2018, 06:08:05 PM »
*Originally Posted by BayAreaCelt [+]
Crikey. Who the feck doesnt wear a helmet? I mean, thats... rather flat Earth, sorry to say. Darwin sorts those dull eyed mouth breathers out. Is it only an American thing? http://www.cnn.com/2011/US/07/04/new.york.motorcyclist.death/index.html

I mean... I dont see people in Europe (I have seen in random Asian countries) riding without Helmets. It is also the Law as well.

I admire America for many things, but some stuff they do go full retard.. Not wearing appropriate riding gear is up there for me personally.. I see folk on motorcycles in t shirts, shorts and flip flops in California, and in other states too. I hope very much they wipe out before they breed so as not to transmit teh stupids
Luckily the Human is very adaptive and Good strong education can over-power genetics...The problem we have is at the moment motorcycling education is not strong enough to over-power....We need more hard hitting TV and social media films and pics showing what happens when bear legs and arms slides down rough tarmac at 70 MPH :110: :028:
« Last Edit: July 19, 2018, 06:09:52 PM by belpas »
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Offline CaptainTrips

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Re: Animal-Related Motorcycle Collisions in North Dakota
« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2018, 06:13:23 PM »
*Originally Posted by belpas [+]
Luckily the Human is very adaptive and Good strong education can over-power genetics...The problem we have is at the moment motorcycling education is not strong enough to over-power....We need more hard hitting TV and social media films and pics showing what happens when bear legs and arms slides down rough tarmac at 70 MPH :110: :028:
From personal experience: seeing IS believing.  :155:

BTW, my friend was wearing good gloves and riding jacket and boots. He was not wearing is riding pants that afternoon and was lucky to have had only abrasions to both kneecaps.
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Offline Icy

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Re: Animal-Related Motorcycle Collisions in North Dakota
« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2018, 07:07:41 PM »
*Originally Posted by CaptainTrips [+]
From personal experience: seeing IS believing.  :155:

 :0461:

Couldn't agree more. About 1 second is pretty much all that there is we have to react.

The video below is our closest call with an animal through almost 60K miles on the road in the past 4 years alone. There's 5 of us. One lead, my wife in front of me (F700GS) I am behind her (TEX 1200) my friend behind me (T800) and one more friend tailing. Both my and my friend's cameras captured the event - this video switches back and forth between views.

My wife didn't have time to react - I heard her scream on the intercom "I killed the bear cup. I killed the bear cup"
I saw the cup coming out then flatten out and swerve towards me and I tightened my grip on the handlebars and kept a straight line no change in velocity - remembering an older riding telling to do that to me once. It made sense, since keeping my travel vector straight offers more chances of keeping upright than an impact on a soft, imperfect target at an angle...
My friend being the third in line had time to maneuver away from the cub.
The third rider in the back didn't though. He rode over the cub's front right paw.

Now, had that been a full grown bear... or a deer... faster, more mass... [insert shivers]


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Offline BayAreaCelt

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Re: Animal-Related Motorcycle Collisions in North Dakota
« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2018, 07:46:07 PM »
I like how the car driver just doesnt give a frak, not stopping to check what is up or help. Its like that in big cities everywhere also now.  :087:

Offline CaptainTrips

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Re: Animal-Related Motorcycle Collisions in North Dakota
« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2018, 07:56:25 PM »
The bear that my friend hit was a young adult. The impact sheered off the forks on his R1200RT and drove the front wheel back into the fairing. The bike slid for a while on one side, then the wheels caught, and it flipped and slid on the other side, coming to rest on the centerline of the road. It was totalled, but surprisingly, did not appear as damaged as you would expect.

And amazingly, the bear was gone. I never saw it get up or run off. The cop looked in the ditch but figured that the bear would likely be fatally wounded and would die in the woods. Said he was not going in after it. There was bear poop all over my friend's right boot.
"The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test."   --   Robert M. Pirsig

 


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