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Offline Hawk281

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Re: E10 fuel
« Reply #10 on: November 18, 2018, 04:46:35 AM »
i was kinda of under the impression that you could burn damm near anything in the tigers, except diesel. very unlike the Bmw's. i typically run 89 octane in mine and have not noticed anything different from premium, which i have tried a couple of tanks at a time. :084:

Offline Nutter

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Re: E10 fuel
« Reply #11 on: November 18, 2018, 09:33:38 AM »
*Originally Posted by Hawk281 [+]
i was kinda of under the impression that you could burn damm near anything in the tigers, except diesel. very unlike the Bmw's. i typically run 89 octane in mine and have not noticed anything different from premium, which i have tried a couple of tanks at a time. :084:

The only thing my Explorer manual said about fuel was "Your Triumph engine is designed to use unleaded fuel and will give optimum performance if the correct grade of fuel is used. Always use unleaded fuel with an octane rating of 91 RON or higher". It doesn't say anywhere not to use ethanol (E10) and I have used it many times without a problem, particularly when I was in the US and in some places it was either that or push it.

My GS manual says to use 91 to 95 RON (87-89 AKI) with up to 10% ethanol (E10). On that basis I really can't see much difference between the two on fuel requirements.

Offline NiK

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Re: E10 fuel
« Reply #12 on: November 19, 2018, 10:26:26 AM »
*Originally Posted by mjab [+]
its petrol in a diesel that is a problem
Maybe that's why diesel nozzles are smaller than petrol's?

BTW as far as ethanol goes, I sometimes have to use E10 (though I prefer avoiding it) and the only difference I could track is a slightly worse mileage (we're talking something like 0.2 l/100 km).

Offline ijinak

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Re: E10 fuel
« Reply #13 on: November 19, 2018, 03:25:52 PM »
*Originally Posted by eps [+]
I really should n't admit this but one Sunday whilst on automatic pilot I filled up this diesel !! It did n't half smoke - had to go home and drain it out but bike was fine for many miles after that - no long term harm done.  :034:
I did the same just after I bought my 955 Tiger. I filled it from the green handled pump (Unleaded in the UK) and ran it 100 miles home before realising that a green handled pump in Americaland is diesel.   :745: It would only run at a steady throttle and wouldn't tick over well. Drained the tank and filled with gas and it went on for another 55000 miles before I sold it.

Online Will Morgan

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Re: E10 fuel
« Reply #14 on: November 19, 2018, 03:34:25 PM »
Getting back to the original subject......
AFAIK the percentage of ethanol does not effect combustion so (in theory) shouldn't damage an engine or its performance unlike low octane fuel. But what has been proved beyond doubt is that ethanol eats away at many of the materials like some rubbers, plastics and metals used to manufacture engine ancillaries. Hoses and carb parts on older vehicles are particularly vulnerable. Some modern fuel tanks made of plastic have deformed spectacularly to the point of being unfit for use. Products used to seal old tanks are the worst victims with ethanol turning it into a sticky sludge. With classic vehicles that have symptoms of fuel starvation the cause is now most frequently debris from ethanol degrading fuel system components blocking filters and carb jets. Only time will tell if the materials used for modern components are really as ethanol proof as manufacturers claim.

Offline CaptainTrips

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Re: E10 fuel
« Reply #15 on: November 19, 2018, 04:22:46 PM »
Some modern fuel tanks made of plastic have deformed spectacularly to the point of being unfit for use.
Ducati is the poster child for this. For 10 years some Ducati fuel tanks exhibited bizarre symptoms of distorting and becoming larger over time. It is not uncommon to remove an older Ducati fuel tank during a service and then find that it cannot be reinstalled because the mount points on the tank no longer fit the frame tabs.
"The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test."   --   Robert M. Pirsig

Offline vsteel

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Re: E10 fuel
« Reply #16 on: November 27, 2018, 05:50:31 AM »
*Originally Posted by Will Morgan [+]
Getting back to the original subject......
AFAIK the percentage of ethanol does not effect combustion so (in theory) shouldn't damage an engine or its performance unlike low octane fuel. But what has been proved beyond doubt is that ethanol eats away at many of the materials like some rubbers, plastics and metals used to manufacture engine ancillaries. Hoses and carb parts on older vehicles are particularly vulnerable. Some modern fuel tanks made of plastic have deformed spectacularly to the point of being unfit for use. Products used to seal old tanks are the worst victims with ethanol turning it into a sticky sludge. With classic vehicles that have symptoms of fuel starvation the cause is now most frequently debris from ethanol degrading fuel system components blocking filters and carb jets. Only time will tell if the materials used for modern components are really as ethanol proof as manufacturers claim.
It will affect the combustion, it doesn't have the BTU energy that gas does but it does carry more oxygen.  It will give you slightly less fuel economy.

The 51 Oliver tractor, 69 Roadrunner, 70 Nova SS, 75 Dodge W200, 91 GMC and a multitude of others have been running it since the mid 80s.  Nothing ever had an issue.  Yes there are some plastics and rubber that ethanol will effect but they have not been used for decades, E10 is not some new thing, it has been around for a long time.  If anyone has a modern machine that can't handle E10 they have a very poor design and it most likely has many other design issues.

Keep in mind the gas without E10 is not the same fuel that we had even 10 years ago.  Even "pure" gas goes bad a lot faster than it used to.  As emissions keep changing the formulations keep changing and not always for the better.

Online Will Morgan

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Re: E10 fuel
« Reply #17 on: November 27, 2018, 01:35:26 PM »
*Originally Posted by vsteel [+]
If anyone has a modern machine that can't handle E10 they have a very poor design and it most likely has many other design issues.

*Originally Posted by CaptainTrips [+]
Ducati is the poster child for this.

  :164: :164: :164:

 


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