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Online Icy

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Re: Engine protection bars
« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2019, 04:06:06 PM »
*Originally Posted by Brianbrd [+]
Givi don't seem to be making the crash bars for the 2018 model onward - someone please correct me if I'm wrong.

A question for Icy - when you have dropped your bike which bars does the bike go down on the upper or lower set? Lastly, if putting your bike in for servicing are you needing to remove the bars before taking it in or being charged extra labour for removal? Sorry lots of questions - not considered crash bars before but this bike is just that little bit higher that a dip in the pavement could topple me if I can't get a foot down (It happened in Italy one time on a Pan and I just couldn't hold the weight once it had gone past the point of balance.)

They both protect the bike depending on the fall. In a fast spill the lower crash bars won't have the chance to hit the ground and the upper crash bars will do their job. The most important point is not PROTECTING THE BIKE AND ITS PLASTIC WHATEVERS the most important point of the upper crash bars is to prevent you from getting stuck under 400lbs of deadweight in an injured, excited and confused state. They hold the bike off of the ground, preventing your ankles, your legs from getting squeezed in the space between.

In slow spills (drops) as in standing still or trying to do a slow turn and failing - if the bike tilts more than 15 degrees, don't even bother trying to hold it, you can't - unless you are taller than 6 feet and have good upper body strength. Without enough leverage from the ground with feet firmly planted and spread apart, there's no way I can hold this bike so I don't even bother. That's how I get my money's worth out of the bars - let the bike drop, roll out and pick up the bike.

Yeah, I am sure the upper crash bars add an hour or so to my service, but I wouldn't and never bothered with that. No service ever gave me a hard time because I had them either. I don't care if I have to pay $100 extra because I have them on. I care because they saved my skin many times, saved me from having to do more expensive repairs on the bike and overall, increased my confidence in the adventure.

I can also rest my legs on them whilst riding and that's like the coolest (literally) thing ever  :018: https://www.instagram.com/p/BuaOFxVhmGY/

So, don't think twice - get the upper crash bars. They are worth every cent and you will thank all who pleaded you to get them one day  :821:

*Originally Posted by Icy [+]
:008:

Like most other things, I have video evidence of that too!

"...
The first on a long and hopefully funny series on on how not to make U-Turns.

Having ridden all day twisting up and down in West Virginia on back roads, dirt and what not; exhausted and dehydrated I miss a turn on the route sheet like 3 times; back & forth and I kept missing it. On the final miss during the u-turn, in an instant I felt completely drained as if all my strength was just spent and I had nothing left - I just put the bike on the ground and rolled off of it. There was nothing wrong with the turn or the bike... "I" felt dead.

Then I picked up the bike, rode a few yards and then pulled over to rest for a while..."



This happened once more, years and years ago - on my Harley. After a very long day of riding, on a red light waiting I felt completely drained for a second. I put the bike down on the road and stood up and walked a bit and picked it up again. Weird. Sugar low?


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Offline CaptainTrips

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Re: Engine protection bars
« Reply #11 on: April 13, 2019, 04:51:40 PM »
*Originally Posted by Crosshairs [+]
Well of course you can...you can remove them and put the bolts back in thus returning the bike to its stock configuration.
I should have prefaced my comment that it is not 'practical' as you would have to (in the case of the Givi bars) remove the extended bolts, then replace the OEM bolts, torque them to spec, and then repeat the process when you got the bike back.

The point is that if you have the tools and inclination to do all that to save a few bucks on your service, you might as well just do the service yourself and save a lot more bucks.  :164:
"The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test."   --   Robert M. Pirsig

Online Icy

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Re: Engine protection bars
« Reply #12 on: April 14, 2019, 02:50:47 AM »
I have to share this - this is what we ride, why we have crash bars and what they do. GET THEM!!!

https://www.instagram.com/p/BwNVPXDBKL2/?utm_source=ig_share_sheet&igshid=1m392mlpbd4wv

 :305: :821: :082:
"It's easy to learn how to speak, it takes a lot more to learn how to actually say something." ~Icy
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Offline Brianbrd

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Re: Engine protection bars
« Reply #13 on: April 14, 2019, 08:33:38 AM »
Good advert for crash bars! Thanks!

Offline Jon

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Re: Engine protection bars
« Reply #14 on: April 14, 2019, 02:50:28 PM »
If that doesn't make you a believer, nothing will...
Jon

Offline CaptainTrips

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Re: Engine protection bars
« Reply #15 on: April 14, 2019, 08:34:40 PM »
*Originally Posted by Jon [+]
If that doesn't make you a believer, nothing will...
It looks like it saved a leg...    :005:
"The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test."   --   Robert M. Pirsig

Offline NiK

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Re: Engine protection bars
« Reply #16 on: April 15, 2019, 09:13:20 AM »
All good testimonies for the same opinion, so here I am to bring my usual contradiction ;-)

My motto is "dress for the crash, not for the ride".
So what? Would the same automatically apply to the bike?
Yes. If the bike was a human being, which is not the case (despite what some here seem to believe by washing theirs instead of riding it ;-).

I don't drop my bikes, which is much less costly than putting them down at any occasion (I know this childish bragging should have jinxed me a long time ago, but it seems it hadn't yet ;-). I never allow myself to get distracted while pushing the bike and I spend most of my cognitive energy to predict every possible stoopid behavior of man (including me, of course) or nature. For instance, I'd never ride at more than 30 or 40 km/h in a risky environment like a narrow street with cars potentially getting out of parking or pedestrians popping out of nowhere to an interception course. Obviously, I'm not that ultra fast biker which videos could garner thousands of "likes" on social networks and I won't ever be the one leading the pack to new lap records on open roads. Actually, I think I could be labelled a "poireau" (French word for leek, which we all know the average speed).

If I was to crash someday (which could happen anytime, despite my constant risk reduction measures), I would have myself protected by my body gear and my bike protected by my insurance policy. I sure would be p!ssed to see it totaled, but considering the probability of occurrence, I prefer investing in a good insurance, and reducing said risk by not adding tens of kgs to an already fairly high CoG.

The most picky of you all here could argue that my current (and third) T12 has the lower Triumph bars (the new iteration, that don't obstruct the tip of my boots), but I only use them to fit essential mods (like a loud horn and aux lights to further reduce said said (this repetition is not a typo) probability and above all indulge into my light emitting devices obsession ;-).

So here my advice to the OP: check your insurance, keep your money and buy aux lights so we can compare our light signatures here (in a kind of harmless p!ssing contest at 300,000 km/s ;-).

Offline CaptainTrips

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Re: Engine protection bars
« Reply #17 on: April 15, 2019, 04:38:49 PM »
*Originally Posted by NiK [+]
All good testimonies for the same opinion, so here I am to bring my usual contradiction ;-)

My motto is "dress for the crash, not for the ride".
Even with really good riding gear, there are times when your legs are not protected enough. The video that Icy posted, is a good example. There is no way that the rider in that video would have been standing up afterward if the crash guards had not deflected the car away.

I had a similar crash in 1984 on a Silverwing Interstate and the engine guards protected my left leg. The impact rendered the Buick that I hit undrivable. The rear bumper was smashed into the rear tire and the trunk was sprung open. And after freeing a jammed rear brake lever, I rode my Silverwing home.

Plenty of people in this province hit deer and bears. An ER nurse told us that my riding buddy (who hit a bear two summers ago) was lucky to have no leg injuries afterward. She said that most large animal strikes result in compound leg fractures, even with ATGATT.

Also, under certain circumstances (low side) they can prevent your leg from getting trapped under the bike.

 
« Last Edit: April 15, 2019, 04:41:11 PM by CaptainTrips »
"The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test."   --   Robert M. Pirsig

Online Icy

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Re: Engine protection bars
« Reply #18 on: April 15, 2019, 05:14:40 PM »
*Originally Posted by CaptainTrips [+]
Even with really good riding gear, there are times when your legs are not protected enough. The video that Icy posted, is a good example. There is no way that the rider in that video would have been standing up afterward if the crash guards had not deflected the car away.

I had a similar crash in 1984 on a Silverwing Interstate and the engine guards protected my left leg. The impact rendered the Buick that I hit undrivable. The rear bumper was smashed into the rear tire and the trunk was sprung open. And after freeing a jammed rear brake lever, I rode my Silverwing home.

Plenty of people in this province hit deer and bears. An ER nurse told us that my riding buddy (who hit a bear two summers ago) was lucky to have no leg injuries afterward. She said that most large animal strikes result in compound leg fractures, even with ATGATT.

Also, under certain circumstances (low side) they can prevent your leg from getting trapped under the bike.

 :169: :169: :169:
"It's easy to learn how to speak, it takes a lot more to learn how to actually say something." ~Icy
http://instagram.com/soksa.icy/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/soksa/
https://www.youtube.com/user/SokSa/videos
http://www.swordclassri.com/

Offline NiK

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Re: Engine protection bars
« Reply #19 on: April 16, 2019, 08:55:37 AM »
Valid point(s).
I still prefer reducing the probability of occurrence than the consequences (hard to be affirmative from such a low FPS clip, but the biker on the video seemed way too fast and/or distracted for the road conditions).
If you push the reasoning further, we should all "ride" this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M1_Abrams

 


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