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Offline XCaTel

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Re: Keyfob spec
« Reply #10 on: July 18, 2019, 01:46:21 PM »
Mine alerts very regularly when in the tank bag which is just near the 3ft range limit, even with a new battery. It does seem to want to be very close as in in a lower jacket pocket.

Offline Icy

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Re: Keyfob spec
« Reply #11 on: July 18, 2019, 02:42:34 PM »
*Originally Posted by XCaTel [+]
Mine alerts very regularly when in the tank bag which is just near the 3ft range limit, even with a new battery. It does seem to want to be very close as in in a lower jacket pocket.

I am wondering whether or not thing has such a weak signal that it cannot penetrate certain material or has trouble with metals. When it signals "out of range" can you try taking it out of whatever environment it is in and see if that changes its status? I keep it dangling on a chain outside or in my left outside jacket pocket. But I am slim - maybe even that affects this feeble signal?
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Offline KenW

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Re: Keyfob spec
« Reply #12 on: July 18, 2019, 03:32:08 PM »
I keep my fob in my left-hand cargo-pants bottom pocket.  Can''t get much closer to the receiver.  Maybe my fat leg sucks up all the transmission?  (Actually its skinny, its my gut that's fat.)

If I remember, Icy (unlikely), next time it happens I'll take the fob out and put it even closer to the receiver.

Offline Icy

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Re: Keyfob spec
« Reply #13 on: July 18, 2019, 03:49:26 PM »
Maybe you just have big bones?
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Online CaptainTrips

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Re: Keyfob spec
« Reply #14 on: July 18, 2019, 04:44:35 PM »
*Originally Posted by Icy [+]
I am wondering whether or not thing has such a weak signal that it cannot penetrate certain material or has trouble with metals. When it signals "out of range" can you try taking it out of whatever environment it is in and see if that changes its status? I keep it dangling on a chain outside or in my left outside jacket pocket. But I am slim - maybe even that affects this feeble signal?
It would be interesting correlate signal loss with proximity to a cell phone. Where do you guys keep your cell phones relative to the fob? Try inducing signal failure by moving the cell phone around in close proximity to the fob. Also, test other Bluetooth devices.
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Offline Icy

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Re: Keyfob spec
« Reply #15 on: July 18, 2019, 07:17:15 PM »
*Originally Posted by CaptainTrips [+]
It would be interesting correlate signal loss with proximity to a cell phone. Where do you guys keep your cell phones relative to the fob? Try inducing signal failure by moving the cell phone around in close proximity to the fob. Also, test other Bluetooth devices.

That thing works on bluetooth?!?  :156:
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Offline KenW

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Re: Keyfob spec
« Reply #16 on: July 18, 2019, 10:03:46 PM »
*Originally Posted by CaptainTrips [+]
It would be interesting correlate signal loss with proximity to a cell phone. Where do you guys keep your cell phones relative to the fob? Try inducing signal failure by moving the cell phone around in close proximity to the fob. Also, test other Bluetooth devices.
My phone lives in my left shirt pocket, so well above the fob in left lower pocket, not inline between it and its receiver.
Sena Bluetooth headset is on left side of helmet.  Both are talking to each other via Bluetooth when I start the bike.  Phone normally has WiFi on as well.
I don't know if any of that is relevant, but hey, worth a play.

I imagine the keyfob works at 433MHz, at least in Australia.  The manual doesn't say.
That's a long way from the mobile phone, Bluetooth and WiFi frequencies.  But stranger things have happened...

Online CaptainTrips

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Re: Keyfob spec
« Reply #17 on: July 18, 2019, 11:29:13 PM »
*Originally Posted by kenw [+]
My phone lives in my left shirt pocket, so well above the fob in left lower pocket, not inline between it and its receiver.
I imagine the keyfob works at 433MHz, at least in Australia.  The manual doesn't say.
That's a long way from the mobile phone, Bluetooth and WiFi frequencies.  But stranger things have happened...
Weird things do happen if you get a strong local signal. On two occasions my wife and I picked up local broadcast radio stations on our helmet coms while in Africa. We must have been close to the transmitter and it was bleeding over into the Bluetooth spectrum.
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Offline KenW

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Re: Keyfob spec
« Reply #18 on: July 19, 2019, 12:36:48 AM »
*Originally Posted by CaptainTrips [+]
Weird things do happen if you get a strong local signal. On two occasions my wife and I picked up local broadcast radio stations on our helmet coms while in Africa. We must have been close to the transmitter and it was bleeding over into the Bluetooth spectrum.
No, a radio station cannot 'bleed' into a high frequency of 2.4GHz.  (In Oz, our highest commercial broadcast frequency is FM at 108MHz.)
What happens is the strong signal overloads the receiver circuitry and gets demodulated in it somewhere, so you get to hear the audio.
Imagine part of the headset circuitry acting like a crystal set.

My keyfob has been affected by a nearby small mobile phone antenna.  I had to push the bike away from it to start.  The strong very high frequency signal would simply have overwhelmed the bike's receiver.

Offline Benchmark

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Re: Keyfob spec
« Reply #19 on: July 19, 2019, 07:50:19 AM »
*Originally Posted by kenw [+]
My keyfob has been affected by a nearby small mobile phone antenna.  I had to push the bike away from it to start.  The strong very high frequency signal would simply have overwhelmed the bike's receiver.

I had this issue a few years back with an alarm on a Honda VFR800 while in Paris. I came back to the bike and was unable to disable the alarm which also meant I was unable to start the bike. So ended up arranging recovery but while waiting for that my colleague (on his own bike) made some phone calls to the UK and managed to get hold of an alarm installer on a Sunday! He said are you parked near any transmitters? We looked up and sure enough as we're parked along side the Eiffel Tower which does indeed have many antenna's on it. Was told to move\shield the bike as best we could and also to place the fob as close to the alarm as possible. This we did and eventually managed to get the alarm off. This never happened again  :002:

 


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