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Offline peejay1977

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Gen2 ownership dilemma
« on: September 02, 2019, 01:31:46 PM »
Hi all, I realise the ultimate answer to this is "Paul, it's your bike and your money, do what you feel is right". But I'm curious to get peoples thoughts.

So, I have a 2016 Explorer XR, which I've owned since June 2016. It was a pre release bike (I believe) as it's on a 65 plate and the first owner was the Triumph factory in Hinckley.

Since owning it I've put just short of 13,000 miles on it, including 3 trips to France. It's my first adventure bike and I've genuinely loved owning it. However, since owning it, I've had some "quality issues" which have always been dealt with properly by the dealer, but have me in the aforementioned dilemma.

So far, the bikes had a complete rear shock replaced under warranty, both front discs and pads plus all the captive frame engine bolts. It's also recently had a complete gearbox rebuild at a cost of just of just over £1000. I also recently had to replace the gear position sensor due to it repeatedly telling me that the TCS had been disabled and refusing to acknowledge which gear it's in.

I recently got back from the Pyrenees with my wife and I'm a little deflated with the bike in some ways, which are listed:

1. Engine heat, it's manageable but even at 23degress C I have to stand up and air out my groin as it ends up literally dripping with sweat, this is all while moving at speed let alone stationary.
2. The discs have warped, again, and is no longer under warranty. It could be the front wheel, god only knows how much that is.
3. The TCS issue has reared its head again and may be some sort of wiring/ECU issue with it thinking there's a voltage drop. (there's nothing after market drawing power).
4. Gearbox has started getting stuck in between gears again nearly causing me to lose control. Only happened twice since the rebuild but enough to scare the crap out of me. Combined with this while I was away I had about 20 instances of going from 1st to 2nd and getting neutral instead. While I accept this could be me, it's happened more in one trip than I have had on every bike I've ever owned, combined.
5. Rear tyre wear, covered in a separate thread. This seems to be due to the Pilot Road 5's than the bike itself.
6. Clutch biting point is getting tiring, even with my long fingers it's a struggle to operate as there's almost no movement between it biting and the lever being fully out. Something Triumph say they can't fix as its not a problem and is also present on the Gen3 (I've ridden one).

All in all I'm just a little disappointed. Might just be the biking blues but in 15 years of riding bikes, the Explorer is by far the best all rounder, but it's also the bike thats given me the most aggro and had the most quirks.

I guess you could say theres little point to me posting this, but spewing my guts about it at least felt good. As you were people lol

Offline Tiger T.O.

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Re: Gen2 ownership dilemma
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2019, 02:00:04 PM »
Hi Paul, sorry to hear about your problems. I totally understand your frustrations.
I still have the same experience with the excessive engine heat with temps above 23 degrees C despite of the insulation of the underside of the tank it still gets boiling hot and riding with mesh summer pants is a no no :012:
Problem with biting clutch is solved by adjustable gear and brake levers :028:
I'm afraid trading in your bike for a Gen II maybe the better solution if possible.

Theo



There are two kinds of people, those saying the glass is half full and those saying the glass is half empty. But the world really belongs to the ones that say “That’s not my glass! My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!”             Terry Pratchett  R.I.P.

Offline peejay1977

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Re: Gen2 ownership dilemma
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2019, 02:04:25 PM »
*Originally Posted by Tiger T.O. [+]
Hi Paul, sorry to hear about your problems. I totally understand your frustrations.
I still have the same experience with the excessive engine heat with temps above 23 degrees C despite of the insulation of the underside of the tank it still gets boiling hot and riding with mesh summer pants is a no no :012:
Problem with biting clutch is solved by adjustable gear and brake levers :028:
I'm afraid trading in your bike for a Gen II maybe the better solution if possible.

Theo

Thanks Theo, I assume you mean trade in for a Gen3? Also by adjustable levers I assume you mean aftermarket ones? I'm sure I saw a thread where someone had tried that and it caused clutch slip  :084:

Offline Tiger T.O.

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Re: Gen2 ownership dilemma
« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2019, 02:11:09 PM »
Hi Paul, no, I assumed you have a late Gen I bike  :034:
and with an Gen III you maybe opening another can of worms..  :007:
No problems with clutch slip at all.
« Last Edit: September 02, 2019, 02:13:09 PM by Tiger T.O. »
There are two kinds of people, those saying the glass is half full and those saying the glass is half empty. But the world really belongs to the ones that say “That’s not my glass! My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!”             Terry Pratchett  R.I.P.

Offline CaptainTrips

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Re: Gen2 ownership dilemma
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2019, 05:15:05 PM »
*Originally Posted by Tiger T.O. [+]
Hi Paul, no, I assumed you have a late Gen I bike  :034:
and with an Gen III you maybe opening another can of worms..  :007:
No problems with clutch slip at all.
Agreed. I have a gen1 bike that has had minimal issues in 53k kms. Some of what you describe comes down to bad luck. Some may come down to how hard you ride your bike (brakes warped - ?). If you follow Nik's posts on this forum over time (he has had 3 of these bikes) you will see that none of his have been perfect.

So, it comes down to whether you think that you've got most of the problems licked, or whether you think that the bike will continue to break. I would definitely be back at the dealership for warranty on the gearbox repair. I bet that they did not change the selector shaft, which is the cause of the problems.
"The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test."   --   Robert M. Pirsig

Offline XCaTel

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Re: Gen2 ownership dilemma
« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2019, 05:36:59 PM »
peejay1977 - I have a similar feeling about my Bike. I have had nowhere near the issues you have had but have lost the use of my Gen 3 for more than two months out of eighteen months of ownership. I have an e-mail from Triumph HQ saying they are sorry I was having problems (with my in Warranty bike) but that is the sum total of the response. I may well own this bike for another 5 years or 5 months, I don't know yet, but I know for sure that it will not be replaced with a Triumph. Not because I think it is a bad bike, quite the contrary, it is solely due to the indifference showed by Triumph to my experience. I could moan on forever about all the cancelled plans over this summer but that's just a bore, that's my problem but Triumph should of had some empathy here. There are lots and lots of great motorcycle manufacturers  out there and we are abound  with choice. Those who don't feel valued will move on and so they should.

Offline sirsidneyrd

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Re: Gen2 ownership dilemma
« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2019, 05:55:24 PM »
If it were first owned by the Triumph factory seems likely employees used it for business and pleasure and it could have been a press launch bike - these bikes are likely to have had a harder life and while they may have sorted the cosmetic items easily the wear and tear on the non visible stuff could have been harder - i would take it up with the Triumph UK Sales Manager - there should be some good will - but it means you are buying a new bike as at that age any good will will come off a new one . I don't expect you paid less than the going rate ( dealer demo bike)  when you bought it - if you did then this approach will not work probably         
Tiffen - splendid idea - in the lunge

Offline takingiteasy

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Re: Gen2 ownership dilemma
« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2019, 06:27:30 PM »
Hi Paul, I’m really sorry about your experience. I’ve just bought a pre registered Gen III 2019 xrt and love it! I traded in a 2013 Trophy SE which was a reliable and a good bike. My experience of Triumph has been slightly different.  My instrument cluster completely failed after four years on the Trophy and Triumph replaced the parts free of charge and paid for the labour as a good will gesture. Prior to that, I had a BMW RT which was the most unreliable bike I have ever owned. Despite having a full BMW service history, ‘they’ never made any contribution to parts that were known to be ‘problematical’. I suppose, my message is. There’s  no perfect bike or manufacturer and ‘look before you leap’. I hope all goes well, whatever you decide to do. Peter

Offline peejay1977

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Re: Gen2 ownership dilemma
« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2019, 10:20:38 AM »
Thanks guys, appreciate the input. It's a funny one, obviously I could change brands and have a shocking experience with the dealer or the brand itself, or it could be plain sailing. Prior to the Explorer I'd never spent more than 4grand on a bike, they'd always be kept outside under a rain cover, worked on only by me, used for trackdays, crashed, rebuilt, probably not cared for anything like I have for the Explorer, which was 10grand when I bought it and has always been serviced by the dealer and housed in a nice dry shed.

Perhaps I'm just marred by the recent run of bad luck. I'd love to say the disc warpage is due to how hard a rider I am but sadly that's not likely to be true (even if I wish that were the reason lol). I always meticulously service brakes as I'm used to having to keep the older Tokico 6 pots clean or they suffer so perhaps it's just bad luck, or a dodgy front wheel.

Will see what the dealer says, they are angling for me to buy a new bike but are only offered me £5800 for it when I went in before my trip, which seemed a little low, but perhaps thats my perception. But I've seen Gen2 bikes with MUCH higher mileage than mine be sold privately for a hell of alot more than that. Plus they offered a gentleman the same money for a Gen1 bike with higher mileage in front of me which stung a bit.

Offline NiK

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Re: Gen2 ownership dilemma
« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2019, 11:21:18 AM »
PJ, I feel for you and I confirm what XCATel reported.
None of my Tigers was faultless.
Did I went down because of a fault? No.
Did my whole engine blow away in a puff of smoke? No.
Did any of the problems cost me an arm and a leg? No.
Nothing really serious then? Correct.
And it wouldn't be much more than a slight annoyance if I was the strictly hobbyist type of biker.
Since I use my bike everyday all year long, it takes the consequences to another level.

In the first years, I had a very empathic dealer and it surely helped.
Now I have a standard dealer (his only goal is getting as much money he can from me; just like most businesses out there) and Triumph still couldn't care less about us. I believe that as long as we're a minority, things won't change.

Just like I did, you might try getting at Triumph directly, telling them how clean is your bike history (considering it always was serviced at the official dealer). It (somehow) worked for me as they seemed annoyed by a customer complaining.

Alternately, you could change your bike and leave the wondeful triple engine. But remember that the grass always looks greener on the other side, until you're there.

 


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