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Offline Triple3

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2019, 06:21:01 PM »
I do think I am quite lite on the brakes. The front pads are hardly worn.

Online XCaTel

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2019, 06:55:51 PM »
Same here on the front, they seem to be lasting very well.

Online jannerman

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #12 on: September 09, 2019, 07:48:52 PM »
With the linked brakes having the safety net of ABS, maybe Triumph can afford to apportion much more of the baking force to the rear than an experienced rider normally would be inclined to as there seems to be a helluva lot more weight over the the rear wheel than on a sports bike for example?

Also, could there be any difference in the compound between front and rear?

I've gotta say, all in all, my MK3 stops reassuringly well for such a weighty beast, I've had much lighter bikes that don't stop anywhere near as well. The whole setup is certainly confidence inspiring for me. With Triumph and Bosch's help I seem to do a better job at it than I can on my own.

Offline Triple3

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #13 on: September 09, 2019, 07:54:16 PM »
Its no good if a set of pads don't last until the first service. If more braking is done on the rear a larger set of pads should have been in the design. Triumph stipulate first service at 10k and make claims of this as a selling point.

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #14 on: September 09, 2019, 08:05:15 PM »
*Originally Posted by jannerman [+]

I've gotta say, all in all, my MK3 stops reassuringly well for such a weighty beast, I've had much lighter bikes that don't stop anywhere near as well. The whole setup is certainly confidence inspiring for me. With Triumph and Bosch's help I seem to do a better job at it than I can on my own.
I'd agree there with you jannerman. A group I hang out with laid on a "slow speed riding day" in a large car park and part of our day was to get up to 50-60Km/h and jam on the brakes as aggressively as possible to get the feel for the ABS. I heartily recommend doing this as it gives a great insight into how your Tiger will behave and what to expect on ABS activation. No matter how hard I braked it was easily controllable every time. I'm not convinced I'll try the cornering ABS in this fashion however!  :005:

Online jannerman

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #15 on: September 09, 2019, 09:03:08 PM »
@Triple3 I understand why you feel aggrieved at having to stump up and that it doesn't reflect particularly well on Triumphs O/E specification but brake pads are consumables... just like tyres, I wouldn't expect to wait till a recommended service interval to replace them either though.

And what do they cost.. a few quid on a multi thousand pound bike? I'm pretty sure they'll cost a lot less than a set of front pads.

Offline Triple3

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #16 on: September 09, 2019, 09:38:08 PM »
I don't feel aggrieved at the cost of having to change the pads, I don't need to just yet, it was Hawkeye that pointed out he had to change his at 7k. I am supprised that the rear pads themselves are wearing out so fast and the fronts are hardly worn which suggests to me that a large percentage of the braking from the front lever is biased to the rear brake, and the rear brake itself is not up to the job.  My original post was because I thought there was something wrong with my bikes brake bias as normal  bias is around  80/20 to75/25 and my past experience of not having to change rear brake pads at such low mileage., also the design suggests that it is the front brakes that should be doing most of the braking having big Brembo  calipers and pads.  I don't think enough R&D has went into the design if pads are not lasting to the first service interval.   

Online jannerman

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #17 on: September 09, 2019, 10:05:54 PM »
This doesn't seem to be a recent or universal issue, this thread dates back to 2014 (so MK1?, pre linked brakes?) Many posts seem to suggest that the pistons/pads aren't moving freely, whilst another's dealer told them the rear pads are a softer compound (could just be BS?) and others have no problems at all.

I guess it's just a heads up to keep an eye on things.

Offline Triple3

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #18 on: September 09, 2019, 10:24:54 PM »
I will keep an eye on the rear pads now that I am aware that this seems to be the norm.

Offline TTruckie

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #19 on: September 09, 2019, 10:34:26 PM »
yep its a know thing that Explorers eat front tyres and rear brakes.

I assumed it is the linked brakes.  Luckily they are easy to change.
TTruckie

 


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