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Online Gwilym

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #20 on: September 09, 2019, 11:01:34 PM »
*Originally Posted by TTruckie [+]
yep its a know thing that Explorers eat front tyres and rear brakes.

I assumed it is the linked brakes.  Luckily they are easy to change.

I used to agree but currently got 11,000 miles on a pair of Avon Trailriders. The rear will need changing in next 1000miles or so but front looks unused, I reckon another 5k at least. Normally changed tyres at around 6k

Now I need to find a solution to the rear brake pads.
Bike History: (in no particular order)
Honda: XLR 125, VFR 800, NTV 650, Transalp 650, Africa Twin 750, Varadero 1000;
KTM: 250 exc;                       Suzuki: RMX 250;
Triumph: Tiger 955i, Trophy 900, Tiger XRX 800, Explorer XCA; 
Yamaha: TZR 125,  FZR 600, XT660Z Tenere;

Offline Hawkeye

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #21 on: September 09, 2019, 11:06:16 PM »
*Originally Posted by Triple3 [+]
I don't feel aggrieved at the cost of having to change the pads, I don't need to just yet, it was Hawkeye that pointed out he had to change his at 7k. I am supprised that the rear pads themselves are wearing out so fast and the fronts are hardly worn which suggests to me that a large percentage of the braking from the front lever is biased to the rear brake, and the rear brake itself is not up to the job.  My original post was because I thought there was something wrong with my bikes brake bias as normal  bias is around  80/20 to75/25 and my past experience of not having to change rear brake pads at such low mileage., also the design suggests that it is the front brakes that should be doing most of the braking having big Brembo  calipers and pads.  I don't think enough R&D has went into the design if pads are not lasting to the first service interval.

The OEM rear pads are organic GG's, maybe that's why they wear quicker. Having said that, I'm not the only one, as shown in the earlier thread referred to above, who have found the rear pads can wear quickly. Some owners haven't experienced this, others have replaced the OEM pads with new OEM pads and got good wear. My surprise was that I had to replace them at 7k miles, to be honest on past bikes I've always found that rear pads last longer than front, also at 7k miles I hadn't expected them to have worn like that (and I don't think I'm heavy on the brakes, I use engine braking as much as possible). The new pads have done just over 2k miles so far, so we'll see how they go, just something that needs to be checked at regular intervals and certainly before any long trips.
Overall I'm not worried if I have to change them every 6,000 - 7,000 miles. As mentioned above, cost isn't silly, they are easy to do, and the braking overall is pretty damn good, especially with the Brembo's up front. As has been said - a consumable.

Offline CaptainTrips

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #22 on: September 10, 2019, 12:01:36 AM »
I have a Gen1 TEX, so no linked braking. My old ST1300 (Pan) had linked brakes. The rear brake on the ST13 was actually larger in diameter than the twin rotors on the front. Compared to the relatively puny brake on rear of the TEX, I would say that the T12 rear brake would be under-speced for linked braking.
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Offline bazthebike

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #23 on: September 10, 2019, 08:37:50 AM »
My gen 2 , 6k on first set, 8500 on second set, both genuine pads. Have now fitted sbs street pads.

Offline Triple3

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #24 on: September 10, 2019, 08:50:21 AM »
I agree Captain Trips the rear brake is not up to the job. I can tell by my front brake pads which are hardly worn on units that are designed to give a large percentage of stopping power but are not being used due to the percentage of brake bias going to rear brake. Lack of R&D on Triumphs behalf. Honda obviously  must have noticed this and designed accordingly.

Online jannerman

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #25 on: September 10, 2019, 10:19:43 AM »
Rear brake not up to the job, just because the pads wear quickly? come off it.

Do your front forks dive under heavy braking? If so the front brakes are working just fine.

The main takeaway from all this is that it’s worth keeping an eye on the rear brake pad wear, for that information I’m grateful.

Offline Triple3

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #26 on: September 10, 2019, 02:36:08 PM »
I think it is normal braking where the brake bias is probably too much going to the rear. My forks do dive under heavy braking but I tend not to ride and then apply a heavy amount of brake in most circumstances. The rear brake caliper and pads do not seem to be much larger than my ST that had done 31k miles and pads were still serviceable although not a linked system. In over 30 years riding various bikes I have never changed a set of rear pads before changing fronts, which brings me to the same conclusion that the rear brake is not up to the job in a linked system.

Online jannerman

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #27 on: September 10, 2019, 03:03:10 PM »
I agree, it seems unusual to have to replace the rear pads before the front ones, certainly I’ve never experienced it.

Out of curiosity, I’ve just googled for rear pad wear on BMW GS and it seems like a similar situation with owners reporting changing rear pads at much lower mileages than they’re expecting/accustomed to.

So it doesn’t sound like it’s exclusively a Triumph thing, perhaps it’s just a characteristic of heavy adventure style bikes (not necessarily linked brakes as the MK1s suffered form it too and they didn’t have them) I don’t know because this is my first experience of a large adventure type bike.

Offline Triple3

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #28 on: September 10, 2019, 03:58:19 PM »
This is also my first adventure bike and maybe it is a thing you have to look out for on them. I certainly will be doing in the future.  Spoke to a guy with an Yamaha FJR with 14000 mile on it and linked brakes and no rear pad changes required on that, so maybe it is the set up on an adventure bike. At least I now know of the situation and as mentioned earlier the pads are easy to change. 

Offline peejay1977

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Re: Rear brake pad wear
« Reply #29 on: September 10, 2019, 03:59:58 PM »
I've always had sports bike up until this, and I've never once had to change the rear pads on a bike. I just put it down to either the linked brakes or the weight of the bike plus the size of the rear disc.

 


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