Author Topic: Front Brake Issue  (Read 1985 times)

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#30

Offline MarksMotorCycleParts

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Re: Front Brake Issue
Reply #30 on: October 15, 2020, 09:04:14 AM
stock lever or aftermarket?
I've heard that some aftermarket levers can cause this problem - I don't understand the reasons behind that, but with pretty much any problem going back to stock is a good start.

#31

Offline andrewr138

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Re: Front Brake Issue
Reply #31 on: October 15, 2020, 01:24:08 PM
It’s an adjustable aftermarket lever. Not sure why that would change the bite point.

#32

Offline MarksMotorCycleParts

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Re: Front Brake Issue
Reply #32 on: October 15, 2020, 03:02:29 PM
If I were you I'd put the original one back on and test ride the bike - you'll either find the problem or confirm that the aftermarket lever isn't the cause.

#33

Offline andrewr138

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Re: Front Brake Issue
Reply #33 on: October 15, 2020, 03:19:27 PM
I can try it.

Is it ever worth just taking the calipers apart?

#34

Offline MarksMotorCycleParts

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Re: Front Brake Issue
Reply #34 on: October 15, 2020, 07:32:23 PM
Yes, on high mileage bikes. But when you say 'take apart' - remove pistons , clean pistons & caliper body and reassemble with new seals - don't ever split the caliper halves. Clean the discs with fine emery paper and then a solvent wipe, and fit new brake pads.

In theory this will give you like-new brakes. In practice, much improved but not like new. I think the reason is that bleeding a fully drained system is a pain. You can get virtually all of the air out and the brakes will be very good, but (with pretty much all bikes) you'll struggle to get the final bit of air out for that truly 'brand new' feeling.

Mark

#35

Offline andrewr138

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Re: Front Brake Issue
Reply #35 on: October 16, 2020, 03:09:29 AM
*Originally Posted by MarksMotorCycleParts [+]
Yes, on high mileage bikes. But when you say 'take apart' - remove pistons , clean pistons & caliper body and reassemble with new seals - don't ever split the caliper halves. Clean the discs with fine emery paper and then a solvent wipe, and fit new brake pads

I was thinking about making sure they super clean, no debris within, and make sure the seals are good. I don't there's anything wrong with the discs, and the pads are in good shape, with plenty of life. I just don't like the feel of the front brake now, especially with bulkier gloves with temps dropping.

Can you remove a caliper with the master cylinder still capped, thus maintaining a vacuum, and then not have to fully bleed the system?

#36

Offline MarksMotorCycleParts

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Re: Front Brake Issue
Reply #36 on: October 16, 2020, 09:08:36 AM
You can't remove a caliper without allowing at least a little air back into the system. But the best case work around is....

Firstly, pull the brake lever all the way back to the bar and hold it there with a cable tie. You may need to remove the pads first, for the lever to come all the way back to the bar. This will close the ports in the mastercylinder and prevent excess fluid moving down through the system, and out of the hose once you remove the caliper.

Have an M10 nut & bolt handy and a couple new brake washers. Remove the banjo bolt from the caliper and without delay use the M10 bolt to plug the banjo. Nip up the nut - it only needs to be a bit more than finger tight to stop air getting back up to the ABS unit. In the half minute or so that will take, you'll lose a little brake fluid and some air will get into the open end of the hose, but not enough to get back top the ABS unit.

Now work on your removed caliper. Once its clean, replace it (again be as quick as you can in unplugging the brake hose and reattaching it to the caliper) and fully bleed the system before repeating for the other side.

Always use new copper brake washers - they compress in use and don't seal a second time.


#37

Offline andrewr138

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Re: Front Brake Issue
Reply #37 on: October 17, 2020, 04:35:49 AM
Mark,
Do you know if there's a kit available that includes all the washers/gaskets and pistons?

#38

Offline MarksMotorCycleParts

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Re: Front Brake Issue
Reply #38 on: October 17, 2020, 08:46:13 AM
See ebay item 184108717018

Its aftermarket but I'd have no problems with that. Its a bit expensive but it does both calipers. You may get a better deal by shopping round. Also ask your Triumph dealer - OE parts aren't always more expensive, sometimes you'll get a pleasant surprise.

Make sure you have plenty of brake fluid before you start - you may end up pumping half a litre though the system to get a good brake feel.

The other thing to say - you probably already know - Brake fluid is corrosive and removes paint, so cover the wheel, work as cleanly as you can, mop up any spills and as soon as you've finished the job wheel the bike outside and rinse the wheel, forks, calipers under a running hosepipe.
Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 08:49:27 AM by MarksMotorCycleParts

#39

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Re: Front Brake Issue
Reply #39 on: October 19, 2020, 11:08:05 AM
I would be tempted to inspect the pistons before you splash out on them. You can buy them individually if need be and a full refurb kit (less the pistons) can be had a lot more reasonably, see wemoto for example https://www.wemoto.com/bikes/triumph/tigerexplorerxc/15/picture/brake_caliper_repair_kit_front_twin_-_by_trk

 


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