Author Topic: Road salt and age damage  (Read 360 times)

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Online Ollyreid

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Road salt and age damage
on: November 23, 2021, 01:32:42 PM
Hi there,

I'm after a little bit of advice / guidance. 

As it's now winter in the UK I ave decided that after 10yrs of being on the road and ridden through a lot of bad weather both in the UK and Europe, that it's time to give my TEX's rear bevel box and swing arm and final drive unit a good clean and clear off the damaged coating to make it look as close to new again as I can. 

I have stripped out the swing arm and its bevel box and stripped them down as much as possible (you'll see the pics below). 

The plan is (or was until it was scuppered) to get the items blasted back to bare metal and then get them coated or finished in whatever was the best I could afford.

However, my plan has been thwarted. 

The swing arm is not a problem - the chap has readily agreed to blast it for me and prep it for finishing.  What he hasn't done though is taken on the components of the bevel box / final drive unit.  I can sort of see his point TBH.  He has stated that due to the bearings and other parts in there, once he begins any work on them, any blasting medium would potentially damage the bearings and he would not be happy taking that on. 

My question is this:  Has anyone got round this in any other way?   

All I can think of now is using a small abrasive wheel in a Dremel along with some paint stripper.  Obviously I would mask off as much as possible to prevent any ingress of material, but that's about all I can think of at the moment.  I'd also cover the items in some grease to hopefully catch any particulate that would possibly get into the workings.         

I'd be grateful for any hints / tips or other info on this matter.

Thanks in advance.

Olly   






#1

Offline Hbhonda

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Re: Road salt and age damage
Reply #1 on: November 23, 2021, 07:32:59 PM
Rebuilt an old Moto guzzi California a few years back and I stripped it back to the frame . Got it blasted and powder coated, this also included the shaft drive housing. I would advise that you remove and replace the bearings and shaft and then rebuild it after it is recoated. Hope this helps😊

#2

Offline CaptainTrips

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Re: Road salt and age damage
Reply #2 on: November 23, 2021, 09:00:19 PM
Triumph don't sell parts for the final drive. You have to be fairly skilled and require a special tool to change a seal.

https://www.tiger-explorer.com/index.php/topic,13217.0.html
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#3

Offline Will Morgan

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Re: Road salt and age damage
Reply #3 on: November 24, 2021, 07:23:10 AM
I think your chap may be over cautious?  In my experience with care & the right masking materials it is quite possible to mask bearings etc successfully. Then use a "soft" blast material that will not damage or penetrate the masking.

Also check out Delboys Garage on Youtube. He gets surprisingly good results stripping by hand & spraying with rattle cans. The finish he gets is remarkable but how durable it is I don't know.

#4

Online BigLee

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Re: Road salt and age damage
Reply #4 on: Yesterday at 02:15:38 PM
I found a perfect match to the oe finish in hammerite satin black  :467: I seem to remember I had to use hammerite special metals primer as well with it being alloy but check on that first  :152:

 



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