Author Bike dying when you are slowing down to stop  (Read 9899 times)

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  • Online T1200GTE   gb

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    Online T1200GTE

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    Re: Bike dying when you are slowing down to stop
    Reply #80 on: August 14, 2022, 08:43:40 am
    August 14, 2022, 08:43:40 am
    *Originally Posted by T1200GTE [+]
    Based on some of the ideas in this thread I decided to adjust my clutch so the biting point is a bit further away from the bars. I had a short ride and it feels good but I'm about to do a 1500 mile trip into mainland Europe, which will be a good test, and take my bike close to 5000 miles in total. Hoping for zero unscheduled engine cut outs. I'll report back in a week or so.

    Just returned from my quick visit to Luxembourg, Germany etc which was a total of 1500 miles in 6 days. The bike was excellent and there were no engine cut outs - apart from in one very specific situation.

    Those of you who have used the channel tunnel train will know the procedure. On disembarking the train, it is necessary to drive through multiple empty carriages until the exit door is reached. This is always a start/stop process at slow speeds as bikes are behind all other vehicles. During this process. the bike cut out virtually EVERY time I pulled the clutch in as I came to a stop. The first time, it took me by surprise, but after that, I tried different techniques to attempt to avoid the cut-out (holding revs higher before pulling clutch in as the bike came to a stop etc). However, it just kept cutting out.

    I am now assuming it is a specific set of circumstances, for example engine temp, ambient temp, speed, revs, gear, emissions etc, where the electronics get confused and "fail safe" cuts the engine.

    However, it didn't happen at all on the return journey!

    Who knows?

    All I can say is, other than that, the bike is fantastic.  :001:














  • Offline jjscsix   us

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    Offline jjscsix

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    Re: Bike dying when you are slowing down to stop
    Reply #81 on: August 14, 2022, 01:21:30 pm
    August 14, 2022, 01:21:30 pm
    Thanks for the update. 
    Jim
    2023 Tiger 1200 GT Explorer
    2020 Ninja 1000 SX
    2018 CBR 1000RR

  • Offline WDG   us

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    Offline WDG

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    Re: Bike dying when you are slowing down to stop
    Reply #82 on: August 15, 2022, 02:42:16 am
    August 15, 2022, 02:42:16 am
    I’ve seen this stall about three times, so far. It seems to happen when I downshift to first with the clutch pulled all the way in.

    Normally, I use two-finger clutching, so the RPMs don’t drop below high-idle at stop. I suspect this keeps it from happening more often.

    I get into a bit of stop-and-go city traffic, and at 100°+ temps, and have not encountered this under these conditions.
    Last Edit: August 15, 2022, 02:45:36 am by WDG

  • Online XCaTel   ie

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    Re: Bike dying when you are slowing down to stop
    Reply #83 on: August 15, 2022, 09:54:56 am
    August 15, 2022, 09:54:56 am
    *Originally Posted by T1200GTE [+]
    Those of you who have used the channel tunnel train will know the procedure. On disembarking the train, it is necessary to drive through multiple empty carriages until the exit door is reached. This is always a start/stop process at slow speeds as bikes are behind all other vehicles. During this process. the bike cut out virtually EVERY time I pulled the clutch in as I came to a stop. The first time, it took me by surprise, but after that, I tried different techniques to attempt to avoid the cut-out (holding revs higher before pulling clutch in as the bike came to a stop etc). However, it just kept cutting out.

    That would drive me insane, fully loaded and two up it could be an absolute nightmare. I find it troubling that it is so random leaving a "will it or won't it" thought at every junction, not relaxing at all.  :155:  It seems to be prevalent with enough owners, you would imagine Triumph are on top of it and will have a firmware flash to correct it.

    Last Edit: August 15, 2022, 09:56:51 am by XCaTel

  • Offline Tiger69er   au

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    Re: Bike dying when you are slowing down to stop
    Reply #84 on: August 18, 2022, 01:01:56 pm
    August 18, 2022, 01:01:56 pm
    Had it happen once so far slowing to do a u turn , clutch lever pulled in while still moving, engine rpm went to 0 . Had oncoming traffic and was with pillion. Needs to be a recall fix.
    Feels like the throttle body has no base idle screw, and is relying on the idle motor to control idle speed alone. Not good.

  • Offline Whippet   gb

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    Offline Whippet

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    Re: Bike dying when you are slowing down to stop
    Reply #85 on: August 19, 2022, 07:24:32 am
    August 19, 2022, 07:24:32 am
    I love the bike, but hope Triumph come up with a recall fix soon.  It doesn’t look good having to give it handfuls of throttle at low speed manoeuvres.  Loaded up on the Eurotunnel train is bad enough on any bike, let alone a stalling one.

  • Offline Tiger666   us

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    Offline Tiger666

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    Re: Bike dying when you are slowing down to stop
    Reply #86 on: September 21, 2022, 09:02:39 pm
    September 21, 2022, 09:02:39 pm
    Howdy, fellas!  Just finished logging about 1100 miles on my brand new 2023 Tiger 1200 GT Explorer.  So far, one time while accelerating moderately and shifting from 3rd to 4th gear, the engine instantly died as soon as the clutch was pulled in.  Certainly no fault of mine.  I was able to restart the engine immediately while still coasting at 40mph+ and carry on.

    When I brought my bike to the dealer for the 600 mile service, I told the service manager about the stalling event.  He said they'd make sure to do a thorough diagnostic check and update anything that needed updating.  After a few hours, they said all was fine, no issues, no problems and sent me on my way.

    Then a few hundred miles later, the same type of stalling event occurred again, this time while shifting from 2nd to 3rd (under light acceleration).  Engine just instantly shut off as soon as the clutch was pulled in.

    So, two stalls in 1100 miles, other than the few times I stalled taking off from a stop which I have to blame myself for.  Of course this bike is very prone to stalling when starting from a stop if you don't have the revs just right and/or let the clutch out a bit too quickly.  It's not at all forgiving.

    Another issue I've been having with the bike since day 1, and I need to search the forum for more info on this... my engine requires excessive cranking to get it started if the bike has been sitting overnight or longer.  I'll have to crank it for a good solid 3 or 4 seconds before it'll even hint at catching, and even then it'll catch and then sometimes sputter and stall right away.  But if the engine is restarted within the same day of being used, it starts up quickly, as it should.  Also told the dealer about this at the 600 mile service, they were hoping that updating / reflashing it would help, but it didn't.

    Having noted the above, I absolutely love this new Tiger and have zero regrets!  It's certainly not the most refined machine on the planet, but it's super ballsy, has loads of character and is just fun as hell to ride!  :002:

    Last Edit: September 21, 2022, 09:08:07 pm by Tiger666

  • Offline BriansTiger   us

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    Re: Bike dying when you are slowing down to stop
    Reply #87 on: September 21, 2022, 09:32:28 pm
    September 21, 2022, 09:32:28 pm
    *Originally Posted by Tiger666 [+]

    Another issue I've been having with the bike since day 1, and I need to search the forum for more info on this... my engine requires excessive cranking to get it started if the bike has been sitting overnight or longer.  I'll have to crank it for a good solid 3 or 4 seconds before it'll even hint at catching, and even then it'll catch and then sometimes sputter and stall right away.  But if the engine is restarted within the same day of being used, it starts up quickly, as it should.  Also told the dealer about this at the 600 mile service, they were hoping that updating / reflashing it would help, but it didn't.


    Ya, this one’s starting to piss me off a little. I figured I’d give it a few thousand miles to loosen up, but it’s cranking even harder now. I’m going to stick a new battery in with more cca. I’m guessing the stock battery is just too weak.

  • Offline Tiger69er   au

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    Re: Bike dying when you are slowing down to stop
    Reply #88 on: September 21, 2022, 10:09:01 pm
    September 21, 2022, 10:09:01 pm
    I also have the long cranking from sitting overnight, I think it looses fuel line pressure. Have found that if you turn on ignition and wait for the fuel pump to finish prime and cut out, about 3 seconds, before cranking the motor, this helps.
    Even tried this doing 2 primes , then cranking starts fine.
    Needs more testing to see why it looses the pressure overnight, EG: leaking injector, pressure regulator, fuel pump.

  • Offline Tiger666   us

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    Offline Tiger666

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    Re: Bike dying when you are slowing down to stop
    Reply #89 on: September 21, 2022, 10:51:41 pm
    September 21, 2022, 10:51:41 pm
    Thanks for the replies, guys.

    I should have mentioned earlier that my Triumph dealer service manager / tech (who seems very attentive and intelligent) also mentioned that he's had at least several other complaints of this same excessive cranking issue on the Tigers, so it certainly appears to be an inherent issue with these bikes at this point.  He feels this is not acceptable and says he's reported it to Triumph.  Next time I'm over there I will have to ask if there's been any updates from Triumph as to why this is happening and possible solutions.

    Since day one I have always allowed the fuel pump to prime before cranking.  When starting the bike, my protocol is as follows: I first push the top part of the button to turn on the electronics.  Once everything on the display appears to be fully booted up, I then press the bottom part of the button, just enough to make the fuel pump spin.  Once the fuel pump is done spinning, I then push and hold the starter button to crank.  I assume this is the most correct way to start this bike.

    For the first time yesterday I tried priming the fuel pump twice before cranking and it did not seem to yield any better results than usual.  But I will try this again and maybe try priming three or four times in a row before cranking.  I'd agree that it would seem that the bike is losing fuel pressure overnight.

    I am not a fuel injection expert, but if the pump fully spins up when pressing the on button, prior to cranking, wouldn't the fuel pressure at the injectors be ready for an immediately start once the engine would turn over?  I could understand a starting delay if the pump was *not* allowed to spin up *prior* to cranking.

    Surely it'll help to have a strong battery.  My battery seems to be cranking the engine over just fine, seemingly pretty fast cranking rpms, the engine just won't catch.