Author Topic: Clunky gear change  (Read 9942 times)

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#20

Offline Stillwobbling

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Re: Clunky gear change
Reply #20 on: November 01, 2017, 04:36:30 PM
Well just to close out this episode, I went to my local Triumph dealer in Chesterfield. I spoke to Dave the service manager who could not have been more helpful. I was clear that I didn't get the bike from them, but that didn't matter. He came out and gave the bike a good look over, listened to what I was saying and took the bike out for a 20 minute test ride. His conclusion was that the clutch lever would be better adjusted to position 1 which we did. He felt that whilst the upshift wasn't like a new bike it was perfectly fine and didn't need to be pulled apart. He also recommended that the clutch fluid be changed as it was quite dirty. He gave me some (welcome) tips on upshifting and finding the sweet spot etc etc and we talked about clutchless gear changes too. Overall, fantastic service which I shall remember for my next bike. He checked the bike against the data base for outstanding work and declared it clear. He also inspected the kick-stand bolt to check that it was OK and recommended that it be kept well lubricated.  Other than that he declared it well within acceptable range.

I changed the clutch fluid this afternoon and went for a ride. Whilst that has made an improvement too I have to say that I am still not 100% happy with the shift, but if Dave says it's ok then I guess it's not about to throw me through a hedge.

I just can't get away from how smooth it WAS to what it is now.  Hey ho. At least I have peace of mind now.

Thanks for your input guys.

#21

Offline CaptainTrips

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Re: Clunky gear change
Reply #21 on: November 01, 2017, 05:55:04 PM
*Originally Posted by Stillwobbling [+]
I just can't get away from how smooth it WAS to what it is now. 
This is the key. What has changed?

Please note that there is no recall on the selector fork problem. The problem appears to be that some selector forks are not hardened or machined to the correct tolerances. The symptoms can be a false neutral when downshifting from third to second or clashing, noisy shifts in general.

If caught early, the repair can be fairly inexpensive. Let to get worse, it can result in gearbox failure if two gears are engaged at the same time.

If my '13 TEX ever begins to show symptoms like this, I plan to proactively replace the selector early.

Of course, YMMV. I hope you have many, many trouble free miles with your TEX.
"The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test."   --   Robert M. Pirsig

#22

Offline Stillwobbling

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Re: Clunky gear change
Reply #22 on: November 01, 2017, 06:05:15 PM
Well there's the rub. If I knew what had changed I'd have it changed back I guess. A main dealer has looked at it, ridden it and told me it is fine. I asked if it was about to select two gears at once, or suddenly drop a cog and put me over the bars and he said categorically not.

Just to repeat though, it hasn't given me any wrong selections, no neutrals, no double shifts, no vibrations or anything else. It's just noisy when it shifts. I did do some more clutchless shifts today and it went into gear with barely a sound.

#23

Offline Robbomeister

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Re: Clunky gear change
Reply #23 on: November 01, 2017, 09:47:05 PM
I tend to hold the gear lever against the gate so there is no slack when changing gear. Give it a go, it works for me-had exactly the same on an ST1100 Pan and it worked on that as well.

#24

Offline Stillwobbling

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Re: Clunky gear change
Reply #24 on: November 01, 2017, 10:01:12 PM
Yes, I agree, I tried that today actually and in some cases it was better - but even better if I change without the clutch. It's always hard to explain in words, something that's physical. But the CLACK that I get isn't a snap or a pop, it's like someone turning a massive key in a church door. It sounds like gears sliding into place. Whether I preload, change slowly or try to rush it, it makes no difference.

But again, Mr T says it's ok so I'm done worrying about it. I don't like it, I don't think it's right, but if the dealer, when offered money to fix it, says there's nothing to fix then I have to accept that.

#25

Offline SteveADV

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Re: Clunky gear change
Reply #25 on: November 02, 2017, 01:01:41 AM
*Originally Posted by Robbomeister [+]
I tend to hold the gear lever against the gate so there is no slack when changing gear. Give it a go, it works for me-had exactly the same on an ST1100 Pan and it worked on that as well.

Yup, I'm a preload guy, too. Then again, some days I am just at the top of my game with all/most shifts super smooth and other days not so great. Kinda like my putting. :016:

#26

Offline CaptainTrips

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Re: Clunky gear change
Reply #26 on: November 02, 2017, 03:42:44 PM
*Originally Posted by SteveADV [+]
Yup, I'm a preload guy, too. Then again, some days I am just at the top of my game with all/most shifts super smooth and other days not so great. Kinda like my putting. :016:
:0461:
"The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test."   --   Robert M. Pirsig

#27

Online anaheimtex

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Re: Clunky gear change
Reply #27 on: November 02, 2017, 06:21:30 PM
aside from bikes with slipper clutches, most bikes I have ridden over the years had some degree of clunkiness.  I remember a few manual transmission cars which were rather clunky.  something to think about in regards to motorcycle transmissions.  there are so many factors which could lead to clunky.  how much throttle, speed, was the clutch fully disengaged, force on the shift lever, and such.  we as humans do not conduct a shift the exact same way each time.  who is to say a few wrong things don't produce the CLUNK.  I have speed shifted through the gears at full throttle and smooth as silk.  granny driving (like I am in England) and clunk.  since there is no synchro gear in these things, or slipper, crap going to bump around a bit and possibly not align well as it should.   on older bikes with higher milage, all the parts in there could be "with in specs".  but when you add all the low end of the specs up, they add up to a out of spec whole. this is where many bike mechs miss the problem. 

just my worthless $.02.
don't come to a cat forum saying you should have bought a dog.

#28

Offline Stillwobbling

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Re: Clunky gear change
Reply #28 on: November 02, 2017, 08:21:54 PM
Well that's interesting and you must have been reading my mind. OK OK I did say I'd done with this topic but with little else to occupy my tiny brain at the moment, I have been mulling. Or perhaps stewing.

I've been looking for the variables that give me a good change and a clunky change and in truth whilst more clunk than click, changes aren't always bad. Which is odd.

Looking at the bike again today with a cuppa, I noticed that there was considerable end-float on the shaft attached to the shift lever. So what? Well this lever passes through a shroud with the other end connected to an adjustable rod that then makes the selection. So my trig isn't good enough to work out the change in hypotenuse but with a good 5mm end float there will be, effectively, a change in the length of the connecting rod (don't be picky, you know what I mean) This is a variable that can be reduced. So I took the lever off, removed the E clip and put an additional thrust washer on there before reassembling it. Look I am not a rocket engineer, but removing half the end float isn't difficult is it.

I have to say that the result was an improvement. Maybe it's all in my mind. Maybe I'm just a rubbish rider, but I have to say that changes were improved.  Do remember this is a 2012 bike with nearly 30K on it so it's certainly run in.

#29

Offline jaiyenyen

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Re: Clunky gear change
Reply #29 on: November 03, 2017, 09:35:55 PM
*Originally Posted by Stillwobbling [+]
Well that's interesting and you must have been reading my mind. OK OK I did say I'd done with this topic but with little else to occupy my tiny brain at the moment, I have been mulling. Or perhaps stewing.

I've been looking for the variables that give me a good change and a clunky change and in truth whilst more clunk than click, changes aren't always bad. Which is odd.

Looking at the bike again today with a cuppa, I noticed that there was considerable end-float on the shaft attached to the shift lever. So what? Well this lever passes through a shroud with the other end connected to an adjustable rod that then makes the selection. So my trig isn't good enough to work out the change in hypotenuse but with a good 5mm end float there will be, effectively, a change in the length of the connecting rod (don't be picky, you know what I mean) This is a variable that can be reduced. So I took the lever off, removed the E clip and put an additional thrust washer on there before reassembling it. Look I am not a rocket engineer, but removing half the end float isn't difficult is it.

I have to say that the result was an improvement. Maybe it's all in my mind. Maybe I'm just a rubbish rider, but I have to say that changes were improved.  Do remember this is a 2012 bike with nearly 30K on it so it's certainly run in.
  My 2017 XCA will have a little clunk sometimes going from 2nd to 3rd and sometimes 3rd to 4th. Not all the time and if I get the timing just right not at all. As well if I am on it a bit and shifting around 6 to 7000 rpm it is smooth as silk, always.