08 Feb 23, 01:37 am

Recent Posts

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11
New Members / Re: New member Bjorn_OW
« Last post by Bjorn_OW on Yesterday at 01:44:50 pm »
*Originally Posted by tdragger [+]
Welcome aboard.  Your country is high on my wish list to visit and ride some day.  I bet the western coastline is magnificent as well as the inland forests.  Nordkapp is a bucket list destination.

Thanks! I sure appreciate it.  :002:

Norway has excellent bike rides almost all over. I live close by the Telemark region and enjoy the inland twisties there as often as time allows. The Western coast of southern Norway sure has magnificent scenery! To get a feel of the western coast as well as southern Norway, you should see some of the Youtube videos this guy makes, he has a lot of quality footage: https://www.youtube.com/@tshansen/playlists

North cape / Nordkapp by bike is on my bucket list as well, and I plan for it to happen this summer. I hope you'll make it some time too.  :152:
12
Tiger 1200 - General Discussion (Gen 4 - 2022 on) / Re: Tie Down Tips
« Last post by Deaks on Yesterday at 11:54:36 am »
 :0461:

In addition, with the single strap across the seat, when you ratchet it on the left side the aim is not really to fully compress the suspension but to tension the the bike against the sidestand.

In any case, you can only do so much and then you have to leave it and hope it's not a horrific crossing.  :027:
13
New Members / Re: New member Bjorn_OW
« Last post by tdragger on Yesterday at 11:42:39 am »
Welcome aboard.  Your country is high on my wish list to visit and ride some day.  I bet the western coastline is magnificent as well as the inland forests.  Nordkapp is a bucket list destination.
14
Tiger 1200 - General Discussion (Gen 4 - 2022 on) / Re: Tie Down Tips
« Last post by Will Morgan on Yesterday at 09:22:55 am »
*Originally Posted by Bjorn_OW [+]
Maybe a bit late as OP probably have made the trip by now. But still, lashing on ferries are important to know. I frown on the "over saddle" method as it requires so hard lashing over the bike that you're certain the suspension is well compressed. With a risk of the saddle to tear or break. If not being lashed down hard this way, the bike is likely to shift and move if rough sea is encountered as the bike's suspension compress and release due to the vessel/ferry movements at sea.

But to an ADV bike that normally has protruding pillion foot rest hangers and even solid crash bars, three anchoring lashes are required. I'd like to lash down the bike myself in this way:
1) Put the bike on the side stand.
2) Engage 1st gear.
3) One lashing from the left pillion foot rest hanger diagonally forward, out from the bike to forward lashing point in ships cargo deck. Lashing length need max to be +1m / 3-5'
4) One lashing from the left pillion foot rest hanger diagonally rearward, out from the bike to rearward lashing point in ships cargo deck. Lashing length need max to be +1m / 3-5'
5) One lashing from the right pillion foot rest hanger lateral out from the bike's right hand side - preferably perpendicular to the bike, to lashing point in ships cargo deck. Lashing length need max to be +1m / 3-5'
6) For additional peace of mind, strap the front brake lever to the throttle handle by means of a small adjustable strap as a "parking brake".

Done this way, your bike is secured to forward, rearward, lateral and up/down movement. It can also be lashed down way harder than usually is achieved by the single lashing over the saddle.
Have a safe trip and enjoy the ride! :467:

That's OK on some ferries but having so many straps would be totally impossible on others. The ferry from UK to Spain is usually so crowded with bikes there is hardly enough space to stand between them. In that situation the option of several straps to different lashing points around the bike is totally unrealistic. You just have to manage with the minimum straps using the lashing points closest to he bike.

As for crushing the seat, I've never had a problem although it has looked like you might expect damage. They use a "cushion" to spread the load. As has been said before the deck hands know what they're doing = they tie hundreds of bikes down every day while we probably only do it a couple of times a year.
15
*Originally Posted by Bjorn_OW [+]
Leo Vince has published their TT1200 PV01 iteration of the slip-on LV One Evo / Nero. They claim it to be street legal in Europe, carrying ECE Homologation. It is not a full system!

Availability claimed at WWW-sites to be week 10, 2023. LV themselves states "Coming soon" on their WWW-pages. Though, it's possible to order now here in Norway.

At least, the LV One / Nero sounds good on the TT1200 gen 3, I expect it not to be any lesser on TT1200 PV01 (gen 4). At rpms below 4000 and the induction sound is audible, the TT1200 PV01 really lacks beef.

LV One Evo:
https://www.leovince.com/en-ba/product/14421e-lv-one-evo-triumph-tiger-1200-gt-rally-pro-2022

Nero:
https://www.leovince.com/en-ba/product/14085-nero-triumph-tiger-1200-gt-rally-pro-2022

Image of GT Pro Explorer with LV One:


Image of GT Pro Explorer with Nero:


LeoVince always sound good but have never been a fan of their looks.  The Arrow can just looks like it's more finished.  Not sure what the pricing is on the LVs but Im sure they'll be very competitive and glad there's more product coming out.  I really look forward to getting the Arrow can in the next couple of weeks but also excited to see what LV, SC Project, and Akra drop so I can start hearing different sounds...and maybe switch to another can if I like the sounds better. 
16
*Originally Posted by Meese [+]
... where did you find the Tiger schematics?

...at https://triumphtechnicalinformation.com/

It's a paid subscription these days. No paper FSM's from Triumph for the newer chassis models I guess.  :002:
17
Tiger 1200 - General Discussion (Gen 4 - 2022 on) / Re: Tie Down Tips
« Last post by Bjorn_OW on Yesterday at 12:16:42 am »
Maybe a bit late as OP probably have made the trip by now. But still, lashing on ferries are important to know. I frown on the "over saddle" method as it requires so hard lashing over the bike that you're certain the suspension is well compressed. With a risk of the saddle to tear or break. If not being lashed down hard this way, the bike is likely to shift and move if rough sea is encountered as the bike's suspension compress and release due to the vessel/ferry movements at sea.

But to an ADV bike that normally has protruding pillion foot rest hangers and even solid crash bars, three anchoring lashes are required. I'd like to lash down the bike myself in this way:
1) Put the bike on the side stand.
2) Engage 1st gear.
3) One lashing from the left pillion foot rest hanger diagonally forward, out from the bike to forward lashing point in ships cargo deck. Lashing length need max to be +1m / 3-5'
4) One lashing from the left pillion foot rest hanger diagonally rearward, out from the bike to rearward lashing point in ships cargo deck. Lashing length need max to be +1m / 3-5'
5) One lashing from the right pillion foot rest hanger lateral out from the bike's right hand side - preferably perpendicular to the bike, to lashing point in ships cargo deck. Lashing length need max to be +1m / 3-5'
6) For additional peace of mind, strap the front brake lever to the throttle handle by means of a small adjustable strap as a "parking brake".

Done this way, your bike is secured to forward, rearward, lateral and up/down movement. It can also be lashed down way harder than usually is achieved by the single lashing over the saddle.
Have a safe trip and enjoy the ride! :467:
18
Björn, where did you find the Tiger schematics?
19
*Originally Posted by tdragger [+]
I tapped into the aux power port back under the pillion seat.  Active only with key on.

*Originally Posted by jjscsix [+]
   ^ I did the same. It is working great.

Thanks, guys!  :152:
Haven't been riding since September due to frost and winter and spent no time in the garage either. I've never used the rear accessory outlet during the riding season, so I had totally forgotten about it. The wiring schematics doesn't discuss "Auxiliary...", but "Accessory socket". While the FSM names the same connector as "Auxiliary power socket". Silly me, not searching for "accessory...." in the schematics. And how very British of Triumph not to be consistent in the FSM and documentation.

The plan and route is given then. Fitting the PDM in the void space under the USB charger box is a great suggestion!  :062:

20
Tiger 1200 - General Discussion (Gen 4 - 2022 on) / Re: Likes and Dislikes From Owners
« Last post by Meese on February 06, 2023, 11:18:54 pm »
@Bjorn_OW I agree with all of your likes, and most of your dislikes.

I'll also be adding both low beam and high beam supplementation to the weak LED headlight. Disappointing. :086:

The TFT needs a user-programmable screen where we can choose what data to display to the right of the speedo. Or lose the big, round speedo/tach and give us a digital speedo and linear tach so we have more space for other useful info.

Blind spot radar is nice, but I also wish we had adaptive cruise control as that's something that I would use often on long distance rides.

I do love the 30L tank though. :018:

*Originally Posted by bwmoto [+]
the aux lights don’t remain on after toggling from high to low beam
Yeah, this one is just dumb.

And this is easily the biggest downside:
*Originally Posted by Bjorn_OW [+]
- The T-plane crank makes the TT1200 PV01 vibrate. Letdown after owning a turbine smooth 2012 Tiger 800 triple. Triumph claims it to be "character" though. I don't approve.
I also disapprove, as the T-plane crank offers no real benefit to my street-biased GT, while the vibration is a notable disadvantage. :110: If I wanted "character" I wouldn't have bought a normally-smooth triple.

I wish Triumph had put the T-plane into the off-road biased Rally models and left the road-biased GT with a smooth 120º crank. I wonder if I can fit the crank and cams from a Speed Triple into the GT motor... :017:
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